EDAS Intro

Welcome to Ealing Dean Allotment Society that manages Northfield[‘]s[‘] allotment in Ealing, West London.

Useful guides for new plot holders are <here> <here> and <here>; For information about our work on Radbourne Walk click <here>

As usual, we will be running our volunteer day on the first Saturday of the month. The next volunteer day is Saturday 7th of March (starting at 10.00 am) when we will continue to work on the hedgerow. With your help last month we removed litter and rubbish from the hedgerow all along the right hand side of the main gate. Thanks again for your help, it's made a huge difference! This month we will be doing the same on the hedgerow along the left hand side of the main gate, we would love for you to join us.

Removing the litter and rubbish will improve the look of the site and improve wildlife habitat. We will be removing some of the fencing panels to get access to the mounds of bottles, cans and general rubbish that has accumulated over the years.

I have been looking into historical practices in allotments, things like the types of crops grown. I recently bought a pocket handbook from 1942 that was published by the National Allotments Society LTD which still exists today.
The book is a pocket book and literally it fits in your pocket and what i like about it is that the owner has written in it, giving a real slice of 1942. In April is written "set Peas on 21st, Californian Poppies and Cress on 30th".

Here are some other highlights from the handbook:

Our plans for the Radbourne walk for 2015 have expanded from our early goals in 2014.
The "clean up" has been completed but regular maintenance will always be necessary. There are two main proposals for work in 2015 the first is based on limited funds and the other is based on us getting a grant from council funding. We should hear in by the end of March if we will receive the main council grant

We started the Radbourne Walk clean up in February 2014 and held monthly volunteering days on the first Saturday of each month. We worked on one section at a time the volunteers removed litter, rubble, metal, plastic and glass. We found a lot more rubbish than expected and created enough rubbish for two skips. We cleaned the tarmac path to remove muddy puddles and turned over the soil and introduced wildflower annuals to the front section in four main areas. We removed unwanted plant species like Japanese Knotweed and we also added Stag beetle areas with log piles dug into the ground.

In November 2013 Christina Fox came to me with an idea to improve the path that runs beside the Allotments. I will let her explain How it all began . . .
Greater than the sum of their parts. If you try neat gin it's not that great, neither is tonic water. But, when you put the two together you have a winner. Sometimes ideas are like that. One on its own won't go anywhere - but put two discoveries together and you might have something special.
Inspiring moment No 1...

The Radbourne Walk Enhancement Plan
Environment creation
The first of the three main aims in the footpath enhancement plan is to turn this neglected area into a visually attractive and colourful place. To create an immediate impact with plants, I recommend using selective native cornfield annuals. One benefit of using annual plants is that they will grow quickly from seed within one year. Another important benefit of these plants is that in the long-term these species will eventually die out unless the soil is annually turned over.

Saturday 7th February was our first work day of the new year and the first day of our new project to sort out the hedgerow that encloses the allotments. It's a long long time since the hedgerow had been cleared and it was clear to see that a lot of rubbish and other things had accumulated over the years. What better way to start the year than a spring clean? As ever, the work was easier thanks to a bunch of volunteers both allotment holders and other members of the local community.

Northfield Allotments - Hedgerow restoration

It seems that many people want to know how to correctly prune their fruit trees. You may have an old tree that looks like a monster or just bought a new young tree and want to know how to create the best shape for fruit production.

I personally looked at various sources of information in old books and leaflets but i found that videos really gave the best help because you get a chance to see actual trees being pruned in real situations. Also these videos are made professional nurserymen with years of experience in most cases.

I have selected 17 videos, yep i said 17 and if you manage to watch them all i really think you will feel confident in understanding what to do and what NOT to do when pruning fruit tree. Don't just watch a couple then think that is enough, the repetition in the videos helps ingrain the knowledge into your brain . . . i didn't say brain-washing!

Pruning trees

Why does Santa need three allotments?

wheelbarrow in winter - Ealing allotments

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